HIST2300.007

American History before 1877

Spring 2012
Tuesday-Thursday 12:30–1:50

 

Instructor: Dr. Mark Stoll
Office: HH 135     Office hours: Tuesday 11:30–12:30, and by appointment
E-mail: Mark.Stoll@ttu.edu     Phone: 742-3744 lv. msg.     Web: http://courses.ttu.edu/mstoll/

T.A.: Nikki Davis
Acers - Kunkel
Office hours: HH 151
Tues.-Thurs. 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. or by appointment
E-mail: gari.n.davis@ttu.edu
T.A.: Cody Lass
Langley - Williamson
Office hours: HH223
Tues.-Thurs. 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. or by appointment
E-mail: cody.lass@ttu.edu

Textbooks:

William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England
Link to Study Questions

Richard Archer, As If an Enemy's Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution
Link to Study Questions

John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800
Link to Study Questions

Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias: A Story of Sex and Salvation in 19th-Century America
Link to Study Questions

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Link to Study Questions

James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War
Link to Study Questions

Recommended: Hugh Brogan, The Penguin History of the USA, 2nd ed.

Format: Lecture.

Grading:

·         Three examinations, in HH104, are tentatively scheduled according to the lecture schedule.

·         Students must bring bluebooks on exam days.

·         All make-up exams and quizzes will be given on the last Monday of classes only.

·         There will be a quiz over each book to be discussed.

·         Each midterm counts 22% of the final grade; the final counts 32%; and the six book-quiz grades together count 24%.

Attendance: Attendance will be taken in class and in discussion sections. Students with perfect attendance will receive a bonus of 3 points on their final grades. Students who miss more than 2 classes will lose 1.5 points off their final grades for each absence over two. Absences may be excused with written evidence of dire need, that is, death in the family, hospitalization, illness, etc. Students who have been absent shall present written excuses to their T.A.'s.

Electronics in the Classroom: Because electronic devices distract both the student and other students around them, all electronic devices must be turned off during class time. This means no texting or other use of cell phones, and no laptops. Laptops may be used only if the instructor gives permission, but students must use the computer for class-related activities only, such as note-taking. This means no e-mail, social media, Internet surfing, video watching, or other non-academic activities. If, during an exam, a student is seen using any electronic device, the exam will be collected immediately at that moment and receive a failing grade.

Map quiz: Because geography shapes and influences history, students must know the basic facts of U.S. geography. All students will be required to pass a geography map test. This test will require students to locate, on an outline map of the U.S., 20 of the features named on the following list. A passing score is 80%. The test will be taken in discussion sections during the second week of class. Students will have opportunities to retake the map quiz if they fail, but must pass before March 9 (Spring Break). Students must be able to locate the following on an outline map:

All 50 states by name

Rio Grande

Washington, D.C.

Canada

Appalachian Mountains

New York City

Mexico

Rocky Mountains

Philadelphia

Pacific Ocean

Sierra Nevada

Boston

Gulf of Mexico

Cascade Range

Atlanta

Atlantic Ocean

All 5 Great Lakes by name

Chicago

St. Lawrence River

Great Salt Lake

New Orleans

Hudson River

Puget Sound

St. Louis

Ohio River

Great Basin

Denver

Mississippi River

Great Plains

Santa Fe

Missouri River

Chesapeake Bay

Salt Lake City

Arkansas River

Florida Keys

Los Angeles

Columbia River

Cape Cod

San Francisco

Colorado River

Cape Canaveral

Seattle

 

Long Island

 

Note: These geographical features can be found in most encyclopedias and atlases. You might also try your luck on Wikipedia or Google Maps. Attached to this syllabus is a blank map for you to practice with.


 

Spring 2012 Course Schedule

Complete the readings for each date before discussion is scheduled.
Dates are tentative; the professor reserves the right to make changes.
Changes to the Web page supersede any printed class handouts.

Jan 19 INTRODUCTION

Jan 24 AMERICA BEFORE CONQUEST

Jan 26 EXPLORATION AND EMPIRE
Map Quiz

Jan 31 SPANISH EMPIRE
Discussion: William Cronon,
Changes in the Land
Link to Study Questions

Feb 2 ENGLISH COLONIZATION: VIRGINIA and THE FRENCH IN AMERICA

Feb 7 THE PURITAN COLONIES: NEW ENGLAND

Feb 9 COLONISTS, SLAVES, AND IMMIGRANTS

Feb 14 THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND POLITICAL IDEALS
Discussion: Richard Archer, As If an Enemy's Country
Link to Study Questions

Feb 16 THE CAUSES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Feb 21 EXAMINATION #1

Feb 23 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Feb 28 THE CONSTITUTION AND REPUBLICAN IDEALS

Mar 1 THE NEW GOVERNMENT TESTED

Mar 6 REPUBLICAN "REVOLUTION OF 1800"
Discussion: Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson
Link to Study Questions

Mar 8 THE WAR OF 1812

Mar 10-18 SPRING BREAK

Mar 20 THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Mar 22 THE SECOND GREAT AWAKENING

Mar 27 THE SECOND GREAT AWAKENING
Discussion
: Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias
Link to Study Questions

Mar 29 EXAMINATION #2

Apr 3 GOOD FEELING AND BAD: THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE; JACKSONIAN DEMOCRACY

Apr 5 JACKSON’S PRESIDENCY

Apr 10 ANTEBELLUM SOCIETY

Apr 12 SLAVERY, ABOLITION, AND "POSITIVE GOOD"

Apr 17 WESTWARD EXPANSION
Discussion: Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Link to Study Questions

Apr 19 THE MEXICAN WAR

Apr 24 THE PROBLEM OF SLAVERY

Apr 26 CRISIS AND BLOODSHED

 May 1 SECESSION AND WAR; THE CIVIL WAR
Discussion: James M. McPherson, For Cause and Comrades
Link to Study Questions

May 3 THE CIVIL WAR

May 7 All Make-Up Exams

May 8 RECONSTRUCTION AND POSTWAR AMERICA

FINAL EXAM: 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 15


Required Bureaucratic Educational Jargon Section:

Core Purpose Statement: This course satisfies the Texas Tech University core curriculum requirement in the social and behavioral sciences.

Core Competency Statement: Students completing this course should be able to demonstrate the ability to assess critically claims about social issues, human behavior, and diversity in human experiences.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Curriculum Objective: The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase the student’s knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity.

Expected Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to (1) identify and critique alternative explanations for claims about social issues in history; (2) demonstrate knowledge of the origins and evolution of U.S. political systems; (3) demonstrate the ability to assess critically claims about social issues, human behavior, and diversity in human experiences; (4) identify major geographic features of the United States; (5) describe major events and themes in American history since 1877; (6) explain the development of American institutions and policies; and (7) identify major historical events, people, and institutions that shape contemporary society and major issues.

Assessment of Expected Learning Outcomes: Student learning will be assessed through a map test for “outcome” 4 and for “outcomes” 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 through objective and essay exam questions, graded according to the criteria listed on the professor’s Website and weighted as described in the syllabus. Naturally.

Note: Students who, because of a disabling condition, require some special arrangements in order to meet course requirements should contact the instructor as soon as possible to make necessary accommodations. Students should present appropriate verification from Disabled Student Services, Dean of Students Office. Students may not retake exams or quizzes taken prior to presentation of documentation.

The professor reserves the right to change this syllabus at his discretion. Changes will be announced in class and posted on the class Webpages.