HIST 2300.160

American History before 1877

Spring 2024
Tuesday-Thursday 11:00–12:20

 

Instructor: Dr. Mark Stoll
Office: HUMA 454     Office hours: Tuesday & Thursday 12:30–1:45 p.m. and by appointment
E-mail:Mark.Stoll@ttu.edu     Web:http://www.markstoll.net/

 

T.A.s

A to Glasscock

Isaac Garrott

HUMA 161

Tue. 9–10:45, Th. 10–10:45

igarrott@ttu.edu

Goertz to Owens

Emmanuel Ojelabi

HUMA 163

Tue. 1–3pm, Wed. 12:30-1:30pm

eojelabi@ttu.edu

Paxton to Z

Jackson Santa Ana

HUMA 161

Tue., 1–2, Thu. 3–5

jacsanta@ttu.edu

 

Textbooks

Camilla Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma
Click here to go to the Study Questions

Peter Charles Hoffer, When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield: Enlightenment, Revival, and the Power of the Printed Word
Click here to go to the Study Questions

Joseph J. Ellis, The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789

Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias: A Story of Sex and Salvation in 19th-Century America, Second Edition

James M. McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam

Erin Stewart Mauldin. Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South

Recommended: The Stanford University Press edition of The American Yawp, a free collaborative American history textbook online: http://www.americanyawp.com/

Format: Lecture

Grading

·        There will be three examinations. Students must bring bluebooks on exam days.

·        All make-up exams will be given on the last Monday of classes only.

·        Each midterm counts 28% of the final grade; the final counts 44%.

Attendance

Attendance will be taken in class. Students with perfect attendance will receive a bonus of 3 points on their final grades. Students who miss more than 2 classes will lose 1.5 points off their final grades for each absence over two. Absences may be excused with written evidence of dire need, that is, university-sponsored activity or sports, death in the family, hospitalization, illness, etc. Excessive, habitual tardiness, which disrupts class and annoys your fellow students, will result in three tardies counting as one absence.

Electronics in the Classroom

Because electronic devices distract both the student and students around them, all electronic devices must be turned off during class time. This means no texting or other use of cell phones, and no laptops. Laptops may be used only if the instructor gives permission, but students must use the computer for class-related activities only, such as note-taking. This means no e-mail, social media, Internet surfing, video watching, or other non-academic activities. Students using unauthorized electronic devices during class will be asked to leave and counted absent for the day. If, during an exam, a student is seen using any electronic device, the exam will be collected immediately at that moment and receive a failing grade.

Map quiz

Because geography shapes and influences history, students must know the basic facts of U.S. geography. All students will be required to pass a geography map test. This test will require students to locate, on an outline map of the U.S., 20 of the features named on the following list. A passing score is 80%. The test will be taken during the second full week of class. Students will have opportunities to retake the map quiz if they fail, but must pass before March 8. Students must be able to locate the following on an outline map:

All 50 states by name

Rio Grande

Washington, D.C.

Canada

Appalachian Mountains

New York City

Mexico

Rocky Mountains

Philadelphia

Pacific Ocean

Sierra Nevada

Boston

Gulf of Mexico

Cascade Range

Atlanta

Atlantic Ocean

All 5 Great Lakes by name

Chicago

St. Lawrence River

Great Salt Lake

New Orleans

Hudson River

Puget Sound

St. Louis

Ohio River

Great Basin

Denver

Mississippi River

Great Plains

Santa Fe

Missouri River

Chesapeake Bay

Salt Lake City

Arkansas River

Florida Keys

Los Angeles

Columbia River

Cape Cod

San Francisco

Colorado River

Cape Canaveral

Seattle

 

Long Island

 

Note: These geographical features can be found in most encyclopedias and atlases. You might also try your luck on Wikipedia or Google Maps. Attached to this syllabus is a blank map for you to practice with.


 

Spring 2024 Course Schedule

Dates are tentative; the professor reserves the right to make changes.
Changes to the Web syllabus supersede earlier versions of the syllabus.

Jan 11 INTRODUCTION

Jan 16 AMERICA BEFORE CONQUEST
Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma

Jan 18 EXPLORATION AND EMPIRE
Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma

Jan 23 ENGLISH COLONIZATION
Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma
Map Quiz in class

Jan 25 THE PURITAN COLONIES: NEW ENGLAND
Townsend, Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma

Jan 30 THE FRENCH IN AMERICA; THE MIDDLE COLONIES
Hoffer, When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield

Feb 1 COLONISTS, SLAVES, AND IMMIGRANTS
Hoffer, When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield

Feb 6 THE GREAT AWAKENING, THE ENLIGHTENMENT, AND POLITICAL IDEALS
Hoffer, When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield

Feb 8 CAUSES OF THE REVOLUTION
Hoffer, When Benjamin Franklin Met the Reverend Whitefield

Feb 13 EXAMINATION #1

Feb 15 THE REVOLUTION
Ellis, The Quartet

Feb 20 THE CONSTITUTION
Ellis, The Quartet

Feb 22 THE NEW GOVERNMENT TESTED
Ellis, The Quartet

Feb 27 REPUBLICAN “REVOLUTION OF 1800”; THE WAR OF 1812
Ellis, The Quartet

Feb 29 THE SECOND GREAT AWAKENING
Ellis, The Quartet

Mar 5 THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
Johnson and Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias

Mar 7 THE ERA OF GOOD FEELING AND AGE OF JACKSON
Johnson and Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias

Mar 9–17 SPRING BREAK—No Class

Mar 19 JACKSON’S PRESIDENCY
Johnson and Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias

Mar 21 SLAVERY
Johnson and Wilentz, The Kingdom of Matthias

Mar 26 EXAMINATION #2

Mar 28 SLAVERY; ABOLITION AND “POSITIVE GOOD”
McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom

Apr 2 WESTWARD EXPANSION AND THE MEXICAN WAR;
McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom

Apr 4 COMPROMISE OF 1850
McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom

Apr 9 RISING CONFLICT
McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom

Apr 11 SECESSION
McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom

Apr 16 THE CIVIL WAR BEGINS
Mauldin. Unredeemed Land

Apr 18 THE CIVIL WAR
Mauldin. Unredeemed Land

Apr 23 RECONSTRUCTION
Mauldin. Unredeemed Land

Apr 25 RECONSTRUCTION; WOMAN'S MOVEMENT; COWBOYS AND INDIANS
Mauldin. Unredeemed Land

Apr 29 All Make-Up Exams All Day in HH135

Apr 30 AMERICA IN THE 1870S
Mauldin. Unredeemed Land     

FINAL EXAM: Saturday, May 4, 1:30–4:00 p.m

 

©2024 Mark Stoll. The professor reserves the right to change this syllabus at his discretion. Changes will be announced in class and posted on the class Webpages. All lectures given in this class are the intellectual property of the instructor. Any attempt to reproduce or transmit lectures or lecture notes for profit, either directly or through a third party, is an infringement of the instructor’s copyright interest.


 

Texas Tech Policies Concerning Academic Honesty, Special Accommodations for Students with Disabilities, Student Absences for Observance of Religious Holy Days, and Accommodations for Pregnant Students:

These statements can be found at <https://www.depts.ttu.edu/tlpdc/RequiredSyllabusStatements.php>

 

HIST Statement on Academic Integrity:

The Department of History adheres to Texas Tech University’s statement and related policies on issues of academic integrity as detailed in OP 34.12 (see above). Any student found to be in violation of these policies will be subject to disciplinary action at both the departmental and university levels. At the departmental level, such action may include one or more of the following: a failing grade (F) for the assignment in question; a failing grade (F) for the course; a written reprimand; disqualification from scholarships and/or funding.

Graduate students violating academic integrity policies may also be subject to removal from the program. (See the department’s Graduate Program Handbook for more information.)

 

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) Core Foundational Component Area Criteria Description: Courses in this category focus on the consideration of past events relative to the United States, with the option of including Texas History for a portion of this component area. Courses involve the interaction among individuals, communities, states, the nation, and the world, considering how these interactions have contributed to the development of the United States and its global role.

THECB Core Objectives Description Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information. Communication Skills: To include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making. Social Responsibility: To include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities.

Texas Tech University College-Level Core Competency Statement Students graduating from Texas Tech University should demonstrate an understanding of the historical origins of the United States and be able to identify and describe the importance of key individuals and events in United States history.

Texas Tech University Core Student Learning Outcomes: Identify and explain the origins and evolution of the political systems and political cultures that have shaped the United States. Identify and analyze the various social and cultural factors that have shaped the daily experiences of people living in the U.S. Develop and demonstrate analytical arguments in written and/or oral forms, related to American history.

Assessment of Learning Outcomes: Exams.